Karen van Golstein next to the car her late husband bought for her on finance before his death.

Abigail Dougherty / Stuff

Karen van Golstein next to the car that her late husband bought for her on finances before his death.

Auckland widow Karen van Golstein can keep the car her husband bought her shortly before his death thanks to an about-face from insurer Provident.

Paul van Golstein died suddenly on the eve of the national Covid-19 lockdown, and before the 2018 car he bought for his wife was reimbursed.

But rather than be able to cry in peace, Karen van Golstein found herself locked in a battle with the insurer when he denied a claim on her husband’s loan insurance, claiming he had died of an illness. pre-existing.

She said she was concerned about having to sell the car and intended to file a complaint with the Insurance and Financial Services Ombudsman. But Provident has now decided to pay the debt, clearing the loan on the car, after Thing highlighted the case.

READ MORE:
* A “smiley face” in insurer’s internal emails regarding declining claims shocked the widow
* Coronavirus: Auckland in pictures as it enters Covid-19 alert level 3 lockdown
* Car buyer warns of shocking ‘broker’ fees on dealer loans

Provident Insurance CEO Steve Owens said, “Sometimes you have to do what you think is the right thing to do.”

Paul van Golstein, who was a supervisor at a meat factory, died of pulmonary thromboembolism, a disease in which one or more arteries in the lungs are blocked by a blood clot.

She was caused by deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a blood clot in a deep vein in one of her legs, dislodging and traveling to her lungs.

Provident said it was a pre-existing condition as he was treated for superficial venous thrombosis in the same leg in 2017.

His medical expert said the superficial thrombosis indicated he had an increased risk of developing DVT.

Sketch of Paul van Golstein, who died just before the national Covid-19 lockdown.

PROVIDED / Contents

Sketch of Paul van Golstein, who died just before the national Covid-19 lockdown.

Karen van Golstein said an increased risk of developing a medical condition was not the same as having a pre-existing medical condition, and believed that insurers would often be able to deny claims on the grounds that a person had an above-average susceptibility to developing a medical condition that they did not have when they purchased a policy.

Van Golstein’s GP challenged the insurer, challenging its decision to deny the claim.

Owens said the expert opinions of the two medical experts differed and that Provident decided to pay the claim.

Karen van Golstein said she was delighted with the outcome as she feared she would have to sell the car, which was the last gift her husband gave her.

Karen van Golstein can now keep the car her husband bought her because the insurer Provident reimbursed the financing.

Abigail Dougherty / Stuff

Karen van Golstein can now keep the car her husband bought her because the insurer Provident reimbursed the financing.

She said she still hadn’t been able to say goodbye to her husband properly.

First of all, national confinement had made it impossible to hold his funeral.

Then, on the eve of the delayed funeral, Auckland was reset to Alert Level 3 after the outbreak of a Covid-19 epidemic in the city.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here