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Tom Hanks sells 4 vehicles from his private collection; the sale brings in more than half a million dollars

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CARMEL, CALIFORNIA: In an acting career spanning four decades and dozens of roles, Tom Hanks never played the role of a used car salesman. But last week he had a convincing turn selling four vehicles from his private collection at a Bonhams classic car auction.

The cars Hanks put up for sale and kept at his ranch in Ketchum, Idaho, cost more than half a million dollars, at least twice as much.

The centerpiece was a unique 34ft Airstream travel trailer from the 1992 model year, purchased new at the time before Airstreams became very popular in all shapes and sizes. The selling price was $ 235,000 including purchase premiums, especially since the Airstream was not lavishly outfitted like a new one of this size.

“I got it back when movies were slower going,” Hanks said ahead of the auction as he got it ready for the auctioneer.

“Sleepless in Seattle” was filming at the time. “I had spent too much time in regular trailers with lousy decor and horribly uncomfortable furniture, so I decided to buy a brand new Airstream – just an empty shell with an interior made at my own request,” he said. Hanks said. He had kitchen and bathroom equipment installed, but he swapped furniture whenever needed for places to sit, eat, rehearse, and continue with other actors.

Hanks recounted a story from the filming of “Apollo 13”, when he, Ed Harris, Bill Paxton and Kevin Bacon, dressed as astronauts, drove to visit a remarkable tomb. Buster Keaton, he said, did not respond.

New York Times

Tom Hanks 34ft Airstream Travel Trailer.

The Airstream traveled from Seattle to Beaufort, SC (for “Forrest Gump”), with stops in Philadelphia (yes, “Philadelphia”) and New York (“Sully”) – and many hikes in the Los Angeles area.

Bonhams’ marketing material provided the truth: “It comes complete with all of its accessories and furniture, including dishes, glasses, several espresso machines, some kitchen equipment, and the comfy teak chairs and table pictured. . A generator, propane tanks and more were included. To increase its sentimental value, Hanks dedicated one of the air conditioners – a presumably rare collector’s item.

“You didn’t live well until you survived a mind-blowing thunderstorm in an Airstream while in the Carolinas or a similar location,” Hanks said. “But, more than anything, an Airstream is beautiful and comfortable, which is why everyone who’s been to mine has left wanting one.”

It’s unclear how much a product of the same size, year, or even level of equipment might have sold in regular channels. When asked this question, an auction manager shrugged and said, “Maybe half? ”

For the benefit of the Airstream buyer, Hanks also unloaded a rugged 2011 Ford F-450 Super Duty double cab pickup in a Lariat trim package. Kelley Blue Book says a ten-year-old model like this should probably sell for under $ 40,000. The buyer of the Hanks towing package paid over $ 84,000 despite his rather ordinary equipment.

Tom Hanks 1980 Toyota FJ40 Land Cruiser.New York Times

Tom Hanks 1980 Toyota FJ40 Land Cruiser.

Hanks, who said he was one of the early adopters of electric vehicles with enthusiasm, sold his original 2015 Tesla Model S, in a high-performance configuration known as the P85, for just over $ 67,000. Kelley sets her regular market value at $ 41,700. Hanks couldn’t quite explain why he was painted in British Racing Green like an English-made gasoline-powered Jaguar.

Perhaps the most nostalgic sale of the actor’s collection was his Toyota FJ40 Land Cruiser, which is over 40 years old but has been completely rebuilt by a former movie actor who now runs Icon 4×4, which makes utility vehicles. in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles. . The FJ40 was once a rather forgotten classic that only a handful of Toyota collectors cherished. Today, Toyota’s rarest classic cars, along with a number of other Japanese-built cars, have become auction favorites.

The 1980 Hanks hardtop sold for $ 122,000. Hagerty Auto Insurance said its value guide would list a level “1 Concours” comparable to $ 72,000 – a huge difference. Just an average, if it’s one of the handful of stock versions still in existence, would sell for better than $ 20,000. New, at the time, it could have cost a quarter of that.

“I’ll miss it,” Hanks said. “But maybe I have other ideas ahead.”


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Enjoy the Ride with Holland the Pup: Florida’s Forgotten Coast

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Hi everyone, it’s Holland the Pup from Denver, Colorado! My human father, Traveling food dude, and I just finished an interview on the Living without roots podcast where we have been discussing our somewhat nomadic way of life (our last trip was to the forgotten Florida coast) for the past three years and it made me want to start sharing my trip with you fans of O’Day dog.

As you may remember, I was adopted from the Tampa Bay Humanitarian Society in 2015 (when I was only two years old) and in 2018 my dad sold everything in his apartment in downtown Tampa and bought an Airstream trailer so we could go around the world.

My dad kept telling me that we were going to have many adventures on our crazy trip, but I had no idea how many cool places we would see, or cool people we would meet, or other wonderful dogs that I would have played with, or all the tasty treats that I would have the opportunity to enjoy.

We left Tampa in September 2018 heading west to Austin, TX for a travel conference. The car ride was so much fun because I was able to stick my head out the window, letting my ears float in the wind and smell all the smells!

Holland the Pup shares his love for the Forgotten Coast in his latest column.

For our first night, we stayed at Dr. Julian G. Bruce St. George Island State Park which was really close to Apalachicola, a former Florida fishing village which is super cute and has a lot of character.

Apalachicola is famous for oysters (even the local radio station is named after the oysters!) Oyster bones is a pet shop and pet bakery where they make homemade dog treats from crushed oyster shells! I thought I would find some interesting dishes as we set off to travel the world, but had no idea I would have the chance to try oyster shell dog treats! We picked up a few small bags of OysterBones and brought them to the

I wish I could have stayed longer in Apalachicola (it really is a hidden gem and no wonder it’s called Florida’s Forgotten Coast), but we had to keep heading west. That night we stayed at dog-friendly Santa Rosa RV Resort in Navarre, Florida.

Now, if you’ve never been to the Florida Panhandle, you’re missing out! This area of ​​Florida has some of the best beaches and the water is such a beautiful color that it is called the Emerald Coast.. Well we covered a lot of ground during our first two days on the road, but it was time to rest before venturing into Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana! More to come.

Thank you for being a part of my trip and until next time enjoy the ride!


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Tom Hanks sells 4 vehicles from his collection

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CARMEL, Calif .– In an acting career spanning four decades and dozens of roles, Tom Hanks never played the role of a used car salesman. But last week he had a convincing turn when he sold four vehicles from his private collection at a Bonhams classic car auction.

The cars Mr. Hanks ditched and kept at his ranch in Ketchum, Idaho, cost more than half a million dollars, at least twice as much.

The centerpiece was a unique 34ft Airstream travel trailer from the 1992 model year, purchased new at the time before Airstreams became very popular in all shapes and sizes. The sale price was $ 235,000 including purchase premiums, especially since the Airstream was not lavishly equipped like a new one of this size.

“I got it back when movies moved slower,” Hanks said in a pre-auction interview as he got it ready for the auctioneer.

“Sleepless in Seattle” was filming at the time. “I had spent too much time in regular trailers with lousy decor and horribly uncomfortable furniture, so I decided to buy a brand new Airstream – just an empty shell with an interior made at my own request,” he said. Mr Hanks said. He had kitchen and bathroom equipment installed, but he swapped furniture whenever needed for places to sit, eat, rehearse, and continue with other actors.

Mr. Hanks told a story of the filming of “Apollo 13”, when he, Ed Harris, Bill Paxton and Kevin Bacon, dressed as astronauts, drove to visit a remarkable grave. Buster Keaton, he said, did not respond.

The Airstream traveled from Seattle to Beaufort, SC (for “Forrest Gump”), with stops in Philadelphia (yes, “Philadelphia”) and New York (“Sully”) – and numerous hikes in the Los area. Angeles.

Bonhams’ marketing material provided the truth: “It comes complete with all of its accessories and furniture, including dishes, glasses, several espresso machines, some kitchen equipment, and the comfy teak chairs and table pictured. . A generator, propane tanks and more were included. To increase its sentimental value, Mr. Hanks autographed one of the air conditioners – a presumably rare collector’s item.

“You didn’t live well until you survived a mind-blowing thunderstorm in an Airstream while in the Carolinas, or a similar location,” Mr. Hanks said. “But, more than anything, an Airstream is beautiful and comfortable, which is why everyone who’s been to mine has left wanting one.”

It’s unclear how much a product of the same size, year, or even level of equipment might have sold in regular channels. When asked this question, an auction manager shrugged and said, “Maybe half? “

For the benefit of the Airstream buyer, Mr. Hanks also unloaded a rugged 2011 Ford F-450 Super Duty double cab pickup in a Lariat trim package. Kelley Blue Book says a ten-year-old model like this should probably sell for under $ 40,000. The purchaser of Mr. Hanks’ towing package paid over $ 84,000 despite his rather ordinary equipment.

Mr Hanks, who said he was one of the early adopters of electric vehicles with enthusiasm, sold his original 2015 Tesla Model S, in a high-performance configuration known as the P85, for just over $ 67,000. . Kelley sets her regular market value at $ 41,700. Mr. Hanks couldn’t quite explain why he was painted in British Racing Green like an English-made gasoline-powered Jaguar.

Perhaps the most nostalgic sale of the actor’s collection was his Toyota FJ40 Land Cruiser, which is over 40 years old but has been completely rebuilt by a former movie actor who now runs Icon 4×4, which makes utility vehicles. in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles. The FJ40 was once a rather forgotten classic that only a handful of Toyota collectors cherished. Today, Toyota’s rarest classic cars, along with a number of other Japanese-built cars, have become auction favorites.

Mr. Hanks’ 1980 hardtop sold for $ 122,000. Hagerty Auto Insurance said its value guide would list a level “1 Concours” comparable to $ 72,000 – a huge difference. Just an average, if it’s one of the handful of stock versions still in existence, would sell for better than $ 20,000. New, at the time, it could have cost a quarter of that.

“I will miss it,” Mr. Hanks said. “But maybe I have other ideas ahead.”


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CalMac bans motorhomes and caravans from ferry queues

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Motorhomes, RVs and caravans should be banned from queues for CalMac crossings around Scotland.

State-owned ferry operator CalMac confirmed the decision was made following discussions with the Scottish government’s Transport Scotland agency and island stakeholder groups.

CalMac said the change is being introduced with “immediate effect to prioritize passengers who may need accommodation and to ensure that deck space and capacity are used more efficiently.”

The ferry operator said: “This is a permanent change – however, it will continue to be reviewed and comments will be welcome.”

READ MORE: Public inquiry call as ministers’ multi-million pound Scottish ferry spare parts fund ‘reallocated’

It comes after The Herald revealed a Scottish ferry travel lottery for local residents entering and leaving the islands, as it emerged that some roads had little to no space for cars for more than three weeks.

Islanders had requested additional crossings as the rescue ferry network struggles to cope with demand initially exacerbated by remaining Covid restrictions and outages of the aging ferry fleet.

Research by the Herald on July 21 found that the most affected service provided by CalMac was Mallaig on the west coast of the Highlands to Lochboisdale on South Uist, which typically operates one crossing per day. There was no availability to book a car online until August 13.

CalMac said residents of the island who travel with an RV, RV or caravan will be exempt from the decision and will continue to be allowed to use the queue, if they have proof. of residence.

Residence on the island will be confirmed at the reservation point or at the request point to join the queue and potential passengers will be asked to provide proof of address from a utility bill or similar.

The board of directors of Caledonian Maritime Assets Ltd (CMAL), the taxpayer-funded company that owns and purchases ferries, had agreed that all caravans and motorhomes in their remote ports would be banned from March 31.

But because at that time hotels, guest houses, caravans and campsites were closed, CMAL agreed to allow the practice of parking in ports to continue.

Queues are available on all bookable CalMac routes and give any passenger without a ticket the option of boarding if seats remain after all reserved passengers have been processed.

Finlay MacRae, CalMac Operations Manager, said: “To prioritize customers without alternative accommodation and to optimize deck space at the end of loading, RVs, RVs and towing vehicles caravans will no longer have a waiting position or waiting list on all bookable routes. – either at the reservation stage, or on the day of departure.

“Restricting larger vehicles to the waiting lanes will allow us to make the best use of the remaining space for smaller vehicles, whose occupants may not have other options available for accommodation. It will also eliminate the problem of larger vehicles filling the waiting lanes, and vehicles must be removed from the car lanes if that is all that can be shipped at the end of the loading process. ”

These “Made in USA” products are still as solid as ever

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Louisville Slugger in production at the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory.

Chris Monroe / CNET

Federal government disburses $ 600 billion annually for goods and services – and President Joe Biden wants more of those dollars to go to products made in the United States. Shortly after taking office in January, Biden issued an executive order demanding stricter enforcement of “Buy American” standards within federal agencies. Then in July, he proposed a new rule this would increase the minimum percentage of US-made parts required in products purchased by the federal government.

Robert Rodriguez / CNET

The goal of both of these efforts is to boost domestic manufacturing with the government purse and ultimately encourage consumers to “buy American”. As my colleague Ian Sherr wrote for CNET’s Made in America series, buying products made in the USA is a popular idea. While much of what we wear, carry in our pockets, and use at home is made overseas, not everything we buy is imported. From kitchen utensils to beauty products, here are some everyday products still made at home.

Post-it Notes

Those pioneer sticky notes were invented by two scientists from 3M, based in Minnesota: Spencer Silver, who had discovered an adhesive that could stick surfaces together but fail when you pulled them apart, and Art Fry, a church choir singer who just wanted bookmarks. that don’t slip out of his hymnbook. Post-it notes are made at a 3M plant in Cynthiana, Kentucky.

Pyrex kitchen utensils

My parents stored kitchen cabinets with Pyrex baking dishes, storage containers and measuring cups for as long as I can remember. (Some have definitely passed my 21 years old.) The Pyrex brand began over a century ago when the wife of a Corning scientist baked a cake out of pieces of glass that her husband brought home. home because her casserole broke. Its glassware is made in Charleroi, Pennsylvania.

Burt’s Bees Lip Balm

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Burt Shavitz, co-founder of Burt’s Bees.

Burt’s Bees

Started in Maine in the 1980s by a beekeeper (the eponymous Burt) and an artist, Burt’s Bees offers a range of natural care products, including its famous beeswax-based lip balm. Burt’s Bees currently manufactures in North Carolina.

Sub-Zero devices

Wisconsin knows a thing or two about the cold, as evidenced by the Madison-based company Sub-Zero Refrigerators and Freezers. The company has come a long way since the 1930s when its founder, Westye Bakke, set out to find a better way to store insulin for his diabetic son. Even now, Sub-Zero manufactures in Wisconsin and Arizona.

Alex and Ani jewelry

If you are looking for a little bling for yourself, Alex and Ani the jewelry is reasonably priced, skin irritating nickel free and made in America.

Pottery Barn Airstream Special Edition

One of Airstream‘s signature silver travel trailers.

Air flow

Airstream trailers

Airstream Money-streamlined travel trailers have become immensely popular as the COVID-19 pandemic has encouraged Americans to take road trips to travel (there are now a one-year backlog for existing orders). The company built them in its factory in JacksonCenter, Ohio, for decades.

La-Z-Boy chairs

Since the creation of its first recliner almost a century ago, La-Z-Boy provided plush nap-inducing chairs to legions of snoring grandfathers. Since 2019, La-Z-Boy manufactures most of its chairs and sofas in Tennessee.

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A firefighter red Ford Mustang.

Emme Hall / Roadshow

Mustang cars

There are few images more American than that of an elegant Ford Mustang driving on an American highway. Opened in 1987, Ford’s Flat Rock assembly plant in Michigan assembles the Mustang. The 2021 iteration begins at $ 27,205. (New Mustang Mach-E electric cars are made in Mexico and China.)

Not your mother’s hair care products

I do not know what NYM a vs. my mom’s hair care products – but this company makes shampoos, conditioners, and creams that are well regarded here in the USA.

weber-grill.png

The Weber Spirit II E-210, as shown in CNET’s “The Best Gas Grills You Can Buy Today”.

Chris Monroe / CNET

Weber Grill

It’s the summer of hot grilling, and whether you prefer gas or charcoal to cook your burgers and your dogs, there is a Weber grill who can take care of it. Weber sources parts both nationally and internationally, but manufactures its grids in the USA.

Steinway & Sons Pianos

A magnificent Steinway filled my family’s home with music for many decades. A German immigrant to the United States founded the company in the mid-19th century. Steinway pianos sold in the United States are manufactured in Astoria, New York. For the rest of the world, they are built in Hamburg, Germany.

factory-visit-10

CNET visited the KitchenAid plant in Greenville, Ohio, in 2018.

Tyler Lizenby / CNET

KitchenAid stand mixers

These durable (and heavy) devices last for decades and can be used for many more than just mixing the cookie dough. Made in Greenville, Ohio, they are available in a selection of vibrant colors. And like CNET found during factory tour, they have a dedicated audience.

Gibson guitars

Have you listened to music in your life? So I guarantee you heard someone scratch a Gibson. The company manufactures its acoustic guitars in Montana and its electric guitars, including the famous The Paul, in Tennessee.

sluggerbatsmagazinephotos300dpi-7-1.jpg

Louisville Sluggers in production at the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory.

Chris Monroe / CNET

Louisville Slugger Bats

Loved by MLB stars and baseball players, the Baseball bat slugger is an American classic. And yes, it is made in Louisville, Kentucky. You can join CNET’s Erin Carson on a trip inside the factory to see how bats get from a forest to the playoffs.

Crayola pencils

Growing up, the coolest thing I owned was without a doubt my tri-level display of each Crayola pencil imaginable. (I still miss it sometimes.) Crayola’s annual color pencil production is approaching 3 billion and its major manufacturing facilities are based in Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania.


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Chicago Hispanic Newspaper, Lawndale News, Hispanic Bilingual Newspapers, Bilingual Su Noticiero »Out Our Front Door Announces New Biking and Camping Experience for Children with Special Needs

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Lawndale News Chicago Bilingual Newspaper - Local News

Out Our Front Door, in partnership with Adaptive Adventures and the Chicago Park District, announced the launch of the first Adaptive Bike Camping program for people with disabilities that combines adapted cycling and camping. This program invited children with disabilities to ride horses and camp with their family, friends and the wider community. Participants hiked the trail by the lake and spent the night outside behind the South Shore Cultural Center last weekend. Out Our Front Door’s very first pilot program for adaptive bike camping for children with special needs and their families was made possible with support from a grant provided by the Thumbuddy Special Foundation. The program took a small cohort of families, who have children or one other family member with a disability or special needs, on a series of one-day skill-building hikes on some of the most beautiful bike trails in Chicago. The bike rides were followed by a camping experience and a boat cruise with great views of Lake Michigan and the downtown Chicago skyline. This program aims to take adaptive cycling to the next level by providing support and removing obstacles to allow everyone to experience cycling and camping at their best. In the United States, an estimated 49 million people, or nearly 20% of the population, have a disability. For more information on the Chicago Park District’s special recreation programs, visit https://www.chicagoparkdistrict.com/special-recreation-programs.

Lawndale News Chicago Bilingual Newspaper - Local News

Lawndale News Chicago Bilingual Newspaper - Local News


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City Council Talks Employee Housing and New Roundabout: Notes from Moab City Council Meeting August 10 | New

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At its regular August 10 meeting, Moab City Council heard updates on employee housing projects and the Canyonlands Regional Airport; and discussed and voted on approving a project with the Utah Department of Transportation to design and build a new roundabout in the city. The council also discussed and tabled a motion to adopt a new property tax. [See our coverage on page 1 of this edition. -ed.]

Employee housing

There is a serious shortage of affordable housing in Moab as current projects, such as Walnut Lane, face construction issues. Potential employees of Moab businesses, including the police department, are struggling to find housing.

On August 10, the board continued discussions on a short-term plan to increase employee housing. Nora Shepard, the Planning Director for the City of Moab, put together a list of ideas with timelines, feasibility and priority rankings.

Top priority strategies included adding accessory housing units, allowing RVs to park off-street in residential neighborhoods, simplifying act restrictions, and using American Rescue Plan funds. Act for the Walnut Lane project to offset material costs and labor shortages. Other ideas included allowing small host villages, allowing dormitories or dormitories, or trying to get local businesses to partner with the Walnut Lane project in order to fund the project.

Board member Mike Duncan asked about the longevity of RV parking – the board should consider licensing long-term RVs, he said. “You could have an RV parked there for a couple of years,” he said, adding RVs and camping was how “Moab started”. But Shepard spoke about the fact that residents might not support a permanent allowance.

The full list of strategies has been approved by the board and will be referred to the Planning Commission for further discussion.

Airport feasibility report

Andy Solsvig, Airport Manager of Canyonlands Regional Airport, presented an airport economic feasibility study prepared by UDOT. The study found that the airport created both directly and indirectly 488 jobs, $ 45.9 million in annual economic activity and $ 2.1 million in annual revenue from sales and income taxes.

During the pandemic, the airport received three federal stimulus grants of $ 1 million each, which “kept us afloat,” Solsvig said. He expects the airport to be able to count on stimulus money over the next few years.

Swanny City Park Roundabout

City Engineer Chuck Williams presented the design for a roundabout at the intersection of 400 North and 100 West, adjacent to Swanny City Park.

The city received a grant from UDOT for the project, but is expected to provide a share of the costs of $ 78,329.

The city has been considering a roundabout in this area for some time, Williams said. The roads at the intersection are staggered and a roundabout would help slow traffic and improve pedestrian safety, Williams said. The design would move crosswalks away from the flow of traffic and allow “pedestrian refuge islands,” where pedestrians could stop walking halfway through the crosswalk to check vehicles.

“It’s for pedestrian safety, bicycle safety, and it’s a traffic calming device,” Williams said.

Mayor Emily Niehaus commented that a large hollow in the roadway on 100 West contributed to flooding in the public park. She speculated that the “hollow of despair” could also be corrected during the construction of the roundabout.

Council member Rani Derasary noted that the city has already reworked this intersection and would like to review crash data before investing more money in the area.

“Is this where we should put $ 80,000?” Derasary asked.

Board member Karen Guzman-Newton brought forward a motion to approve the design and construction of the project in the amount of $ 78,329. The motion was carried, 4-1, with Derasary voting on dissent.

Moab City Council meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. Meetings are streamed online on the City of Moab Youtube channel. Times, agendas and opportunities for public comment can be found at www.moabcity.org


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Thoughts from the Crossroads: Camping | Opinion

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TV commercials make rustic tent camping so much fun. The weather is perfect. The adults smile. Children laugh as they roast marshmallows on sticks and make s’mores. Everyone is dressed in trendy outerwear. And the tent and all camping gear are brand new and top quality. By the time the commercial ends, you just want to wrap the car up and hit the road. It’s time to take the whole family to one of these scenic spots and commune with the great outdoors!

In reality, tent camping is usually too hot, too cold, too rainy, or too buggy. Often several of them at the same time. Also, usually something essential for pitching the tent or cooking dinner was left at home. Children complain because they are bored, there is no Wi-Fi or cell service, and people are forced to chat with each other. Adults accustomed to the comforts of home lack sports and practical bathrooms. Do you ALWAYS want to put the car away?

My paternal grandfather would take his two sons camping in the 1950s. After that, my father decided to carry on the family tradition and take his three daughters camping in the 1970s. At the time, we were living in the central Illinois and my grandparents had retired to Sun City, Arizona. So dad decided we would go visit them, camping along the way. Ahhh, memories!

Dad packed his old green station wagon (with the super stylish faux wood panels) with food, gear, and his little girls (10, 7 and 7). A good man indeed! We were driving all day which was going as you would expect with four family members locked in a crowded car. At the end of the afternoon, we stopped for the night. Sometimes we would go to a campsite with bathrooms, but other times we really gave it a hard time. Yes, dad was taking three little girls to a “campsite” without a toilet.

My parents were divorced, so dad was alone. He was a good camper, but he wasn’t as good at looking after three little girls away from home. Any reasonable person would bring toilet paper, but Dad really wanted to get in touch with Mother Nature. Needless to say, my sisters and I learned early on which leaves to use and which to avoid like the plague!

One night we camped on a mountain ridge with beautiful scenery all around us. It was cold and windy. But we had a nice campfire and the night sky was beautiful. In the morning, dad lit the campfire and made scrambled eggs for breakfast. Well my sisters and I didn’t really like scrambled eggs at first. The fact that they turned icy after a few minutes didn’t make them any more appealing to us. So we wouldn’t eat them. Boy oh boy, daddy was maaaaaaad! He told us that we would not be leaving until we had had our breakfast. But his willpower was nothing compared to three unhappy little girls who were ready to sit there all day and starve to death before eating those cold scrambled eggs. Finally, dad packed the camp in defeat, and off we went. I don’t remember the rest of the day. But I vividly remember what we ate for breakfast the next day: Oreo cookies and sweet red cherries. Apparently dad had decided to make breakfast more enjoyable for all of us. Intelligent man!

Years later, we’ve all learned to laugh at our camping memories. And we’ve all been tent camping several times, in a lot more places. My sisters and I eventually got very up to speed with all things camping. We have learned to look past the heat, the cold, the rain and the bugs and find joy in the great outdoors. All thanks to our dad.

But… .. I still don’t like cold scrambled eggs.

Laura Schupp resides at Zion Crossroads with her husband Rick and her two cats. She would love to hear from you at hallielaura@gmail.com.


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3 key takeaways from Camping World’s second quarter results

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VSkeep living your financial life on the fast lane, Camping World Holdings (NYSE: CWH) released consensus second quarter 2021 results on August 2. This is the fourth consecutive quarter for the company topping Wall Street’s earnings per share forecast. Unlike in previous quarters, where investors remained cautious due to the notorious volatility of the leisure vehicle sector, the market this time reacted positively to the success of Camping World, its stock closing at the end of the day up 7. 16%.

With the new information available, there are at least three important points to remember when supporting a bull business for Camping World.

1. Record results continue

Camping World’s second quarter set a slew of new records, with revenue rising 28.3% year-over-year to an all-time high of $ 2.06 billion. In this context, it should be remembered that the surge in RV sales triggered by the COVID-19 lockdowns was already in full swing in the second quarter of 2020, which means that the improvement in results compares favorably with an already positive situation for the company last year. In the end, adjusted earnings per share (EPS) climbed 54.9% year-over-year, from $ 1.62 to $ 2.51 EPS. Adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, or EBITDA, set a third record, jumping 51% to $ 333.3 million.

Image source: Getty Images.

The company has also expanded its SuperCenter dealer network to nine locations. As a result, it now has a current or future presence in 46 of the 48 contiguous U.S. states, bringing it closer to its strategic goal of establishing a physical presence in each state.

Significantly, Camping World’s gross and net margins both improved. Gross margin increased 644 basis points to 36.9%, while net margin increased from 10.2% to 11.9% year-on-year. From this, it is possible to deduce that the growth in the profitability of the company is not just due to increased sales, but also to increased efficiency and better margins on individual sales.

Seeking better margins is a strategic objective for Camping World, which the motorhome seller appears to be achieving with considerable success. On the second quarter earnings conference call, CEO Marcus Lemonis underscored this growth factor when he said that “margin maximization” is “a golden ticket given to us, and c ‘is our obligation to grasp that. “

2. It improves the quality of its actions and its balance sheet

Not content with the increase in sales, Camping World appears to be reinvesting at least a portion of its record earnings in internal improvements and investments. It continued its share buyback program, reducing dilution and increasing the future EPS of the outstanding shares still in the hands of investors. During the second quarter, it repurchased $ 45.5 million of common stock, or approximately 1.15 million shares.

More recently, in the early days of August, the company allocated more funds to share buybacks, adding $ 125 million to the buyback program. This is in addition to the remaining $ 33 million from a previous authorization. Lemonis noted that “the increase in the share buyback program reflects the confidence that our management team” has “in the future performance of the company and its ability to generate strong cash flow”. Actual buybacks will be done on an opportunistic basis rather than according to a set schedule.

In terms of debt, Camping World has also improved the health of its balance sheet. Her current leverage is around 1.14 times adjusted EBITDA, according to Lemonis, and she continues to repay her long-term debt. It also refinanced its credit facilities, reducing the margin rate by 25 basis points and gaining more time to repay with a renegotiated 2028 maturity. It ended the quarter with around 15% more cash than at the end of Q2 2020. Overall, the company appears to have a meager balance sheet with good cash flow and reserves to complete its buyout program. shares in order to give more value to its investors.

3. Upward trends in RVs continue, tips are improving

The market remains very favorable for Camping World and the motorhome sector in general. Outdoor stocks are booming as people seek out the great outdoors on the North American continent. While many countries maintain restrictions on air travel, and previously popular cruise ship vacations are still largely banned, vacations seem to be almost reverting to pre-airliner models, with people mainly resting in regional camping areas or national parks.

Even beyond the pandemic, however, the recreational vehicle trend may have gathered momentum as more people, and many younger generations, get involved in the lifestyle. RV Industry Association data shows all-time highs for June RV shipments (the latest month for which data is available). Shipments surpassed the previous June 2017 record of 7% and 23.5% last June, with 50,706 units shipped. The second quarter as a whole has the most shipments for any quarter since records began decades ago.

Camping World has raised its guidance in this context of record sales. It now forecasts adjusted EBITDA of $ 810 million for the full year 2021, up 5.2% from its May forecast. Lemonis declined to guide the 2022 results on the results conference call, but said Camping World executives were “excited” about the future.

He also teased that, when it comes to EVs, “on the morning of September 15, we will unveil a product offering that the outdoor and recreational space has never seen before, all in one place.” With an attractive new potential offering for the upcoming electrification craze, strong momentum, a favorable market, and improvements in the balance sheet, it looks like Camping World is likely to be a good investment among consumer discretionary stocks this year and likely. longer term.

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Long-Term Solutions to Keeping I-70 Safe Will Be Costly | New

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The safety of travelers through Glenwood Canyon on Interstate 70 will require innovative solutions to deal with the power of water and gravity for the foreseeable future.

When the highway was built, sections were raised on pylons to allow water to pass through and allow animals to access the river below the causeway. But not at Blue Gulch, where the worst damage from torrential rains on July 31 and August 1 that caused mud and boulders, some the size of small cars, cascaded down the ravine at 1,800 feet above.

While there are options to mitigate mudslides like this, they will all be very expensive, says Dr. Chris Senseney, professor of civil engineering at the University of Colorado.

“There are a few options I can think of right off the bat,” Senseney said. “One of them is to build openings under the pavement so that debris can potentially flow under the road through a culvert or something like that.”

“Another option that I heard about is to build some kind of basin in which the debris could flow out and be collected,” continued Senseney. “Whenever that happens, you can send crews over there to clear that debris and maintain this area. “

There might be room for elevated watersheds at Blue Gulch, but obtaining equipment to build and maintain them would require building a road to get there, and that is not a likely option given the rugged and steep terrain.

“I guess a third would be something like what you see in some really bad avalanche areas where you have a shed that carries debris over the pavement,” Senseney said.

None of these possible engineering solutions will be in place any time soon, says Senseney, “I think the moral of the story is that there is no quick fix to this problem.”

Designing a backup and bypass route is no less daunting and probably about as expensive.

Cottonwood Pass between Gypsum and Glenwood Springs has become a popular bypass for Eagle-area residents to and from jobs in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Cottonwood Pass isn’t as rugged as the other logging roads in the mountains around the canyon, but Garfield County Sheriff Joe Vallario is adamant that tourists and those unfamiliar with the area don’t try. not to use it as an alternative to the approved north detour, especially not semi-trailers with trailers. To prevent truckers from trying, Eagle and Garfield Counties have stationed workers at either end of the pass road to prevent oversized vehicles from trying.

Cottonwood Pass is a narrow, steep gravel road with tight bends that is unsuitable for large trucks, RVs, and RV trailers. Besides the slope and width, some sections are totally impassable when wet due to the extremely slippery mud.

Improving the pass as a workable bypass option for Glenwood Canyon has been a topic of discussion for decades. The main obstacle is cost. Garfield County Commissioner Tom Jankovsky said: “It would take federal funding for that. It’s probably over $ 50 million. I don’t think we can get it to the point where the semi-trailers can go through it, but I think we can get it to the point where it can be a two-lane country road that could handle some of the traffic. I- 70. “

Senseney said: “They need land on both sides of the road to widen it. They don’t own this land. So the only big problem is getting the right of way.

Most of the road passes through private property, and in the past proposals for road widening and paving have met with strong opposition from residents along the road as well as members of the community. Glenwood Springs. However, the state can acquire the necessary right of way using eminent domain power if landowners balk at the project.

Gov. Jared Polis included a $ 10 million request to study Cottonwood Pass upgrades in a letter to the Federal Highway Administration on Monday as part of a request for a $ 116 million disaster assistance program. dollars to reopen I-70 and mitigate future mudslides.

“In addition, the continued vulnerability due to severe erosion described above will likely require improvements to bypass roads such as Cottonwood Pass to be able to withstand heavier traffic in the future while providing resilience,” the letter. “Previous estimates have concluded that the improvements to Cottonwood Pass represent more than $ 50 million, of which more than $ 50 million has been carried over into the estimates below, subject to further evaluation which may increase this. number.”

The Federal Highway Administration responded to the request on Tuesday, a business day later, with a grant of $ 11.6 million as part of its quick release process, or 10% of the total requested by Polis.